While gay teachers may not ‘turn’ kids gay (just as my hetero parents failed to turn me hetero), can’t we also offer up the possibility that openly gay teachers (or neighbors or mothers or firefighters) may create environments that encourage expansive thinking about sexuality and gender?
Suzanna Danuta Walters, author of The Tolerance Trap

(via The Atlantic)
lionized
africandiasporaphd:

The Delectable Negro: Human Consumption and Homoeroticism within US Slave Culture by Vincent Woodard. Edited By Justin A. Joyce and Dwight McBride. Foreword by E. Patrick Johnson

Scholars of US and transatlantic slavery have largely ignored or dismissed accusations that Black Americans were cannibalized. Vincent Woodard takes the enslaved person’s claims of human consumption seriously, focusing on both the literal starvation of the slave and the tropes of cannibalism on the part of the slaveholder, and further draws attention to the ways in which Blacks experienced their consumption as a fundamentally homoerotic occurrence. The Delectable Negro explores these connections between homoeroticism, cannibalism, and cultures of consumption in the context of American literature and US slave culture.
Utilizing many staples of African American literature and culture, such as the slave narratives of Olaudah Equiano, Harriet Jacobs, and Frederick Douglass, as well as other less circulated materials like James L. Smith’s slave narrative, runaway slave advertisements, and numerous articles from Black newspapers published in the nineteenth century, Woodard traces the racial assumptions, political aspirations, gender codes, and philosophical frameworks that dictated both European and white American arousal towards Black males and hunger for Black male flesh. Woodard uses these texts to unpack how slaves struggled not only against social consumption, but also against endemic mechanisms of starvation and hunger designed to break them. He concludes with an examination of the controversial chain gang oral sex scene in Toni Morrison’s Beloved, suggesting that even at the end of the twentieth and beginning of the twenty-first century, we are still at a loss for language with which to describe Black male hunger within a plantation culture of consumption.

africandiasporaphd:

The Delectable Negro: Human Consumption and Homoeroticism within US Slave Culture by Vincent Woodard. Edited By Justin A. Joyce
and Dwight McBride. Foreword by E. Patrick Johnson

Scholars of US and transatlantic slavery have largely ignored or dismissed accusations that Black Americans were cannibalized. Vincent Woodard takes the enslaved person’s claims of human consumption seriously, focusing on both the literal starvation of the slave and the tropes of cannibalism on the part of the slaveholder, and further draws attention to the ways in which Blacks experienced their consumption as a fundamentally homoerotic occurrence. The Delectable Negro explores these connections between homoeroticism, cannibalism, and cultures of consumption in the context of American literature and US slave culture.

Utilizing many staples of African American literature and culture, such as the slave narratives of Olaudah Equiano, Harriet Jacobs, and Frederick Douglass, as well as other less circulated materials like James L. Smith’s slave narrative, runaway slave advertisements, and numerous articles from Black newspapers published in the nineteenth century, Woodard traces the racial assumptions, political aspirations, gender codes, and philosophical frameworks that dictated both European and white American arousal towards Black males and hunger for Black male flesh. Woodard uses these texts to unpack how slaves struggled not only against social consumption, but also against endemic mechanisms of starvation and hunger designed to break them. He concludes with an examination of the controversial chain gang oral sex scene in Toni Morrison’s Beloved, suggesting that even at the end of the twentieth and beginning of the twenty-first century, we are still at a loss for language with which to describe Black male hunger within a plantation culture of consumption.

 An excellent review of Kembrew McLeod’s Pranksters: Making Mischief in the Modern World appeared on Slate today! 

(We’re also enjoying that creepy image of Ben Franklin in clown face featured along with it.)

So what is City of Promises? Many things, not the least quite beautiful and more than substantial: three volumes running to just over one thousand pages, deftly produced by New York University Press, with ample illustrations and snugly housed in an attractive slipcase suggesting care and stature…

Individually and collectively, the volumes mark
a new high in American urban, ethnic, and religious history. These are wonderful books, testaments to the best in American history. They deserve wide attention as reconstructions of a remarkable past and as models for many more like them.

A wonderful book review of City of Promisesour three-volume history of the Jews of New York, just appeared in the Journal of the American Jewish Archives! Read the full version here.

James Lindgren, author of Preserving South Street Seaport (NYU Press, 2014), on why New Yorkers and the de Blasio administration need to step in and support the Seaport Museum and the district’s public space.

Also, join us tonight at the Paris Cafe for a book talk by the author

Listen to this exclusive interview with author Zareena Grewal on the New Books Network!

Leg Over Leg: Finalist for Best Translated Book Award

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We’re delighted to announce that Library of Arabic Literature’s Leg Over Leg, Volume 1 by Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq, translated by Humphrey Davies is one of 10 finalists for the Best Translated Book Award in fiction! See the full list here.

Head on over to Three Percent to take a look back at the reasons “why these books should win,” according to the judges and other readers.

"[A] wide-ranging analysis that touches on feminism, the military, marriage, the Internet, and discourse around scientific research. Walters’s humane, transformative vision soars in this must-read for anyone interested in LGBT politics.”—Publishers Weekly, Starred Review
The Tolerance Trap publishes next month, and the praise is rollin’ in! Check out the book’s website for more information.

"[A] wide-ranging analysis that touches on feminism, the military, marriage, the Internet, and discourse around scientific research. Walters’s humane, transformative vision soars in this must-read for anyone interested in LGBT politics.”
Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

The Tolerance Trap publishes next month, and the praise is rollin’ in! Check out the book’s website for more information.

In asserting that gay, lesbian and bisexual citizens want rights such as pay equity, voting rights, and an end to discrimination in the workplace and judicial system—indeed, ‘full and deep integration and inclusion in the American dream’—[the author] makes it clear that tolerance is much too limited a goal.

An enlightening examination of identity and the quest for ‘deep freedom’ by a largely misunderstood and marginalized group.

prairielights

prairielights:

Pranksters: Making Mischief in the Modern World is the new book by Kembrew McLeod, UI Professor of Communications and sometime prankster himself. In it he examines the history of various pranksters, hoaxers & con men to explore how pranks are not just for fun but are often used to get at larger truths in society.

 For a limited time, when you stop by the store you’ll get a free pack of Prankster cards with purchase of the book.

Hey, Iowa City folks!  Kembrew McLeod, author of Pranksters, will be reading at Prairie Lights bookstore tonight, April 2, at 6pm!