This Thursday, October 10th, 2013 from 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM at Columbia University’s Institute for Research on Women, Gender and Sexuality, Professor Mark Anthony Neal will be speaking for IRWAG’s Queer Futures series on his book Looking for Leroy: Illegible Black Masculinities. 
Looking for Leroy is an analysis of the complex ways in which black masculinity has been read and misread through contemporary American popular culture. Neal argues that black men and boys are bound, in profound ways, to and by their legibility. The most “legible” black male bodies are often rendered as criminal, bodies in need of policing and containment. Ironically, Neal argues, this sort of legibility brings welcome relief to white America, providing easily identifiable images of black men in an era defined by shifts in racial, sexual, and gendered identities.
Mark Anthony Neal is Professor of Black Popular Culture in the Department of African and African-American Studies at Duke University, where he won the 2010 Robert B. Cox Award for Teaching. He is the author of What the Music Said: Black Popular Music and Black Public Culture, Soul Babies: Black Popular Culture and the Post-Soul Aesthetic, Songs in the Keys of Black Life: A Rhythm and Blues Nation, and New Black Man: Rethinking Black Masculinity. 
Reception to follow. Copies of Looking for Leroy will be available for purchase. We hope to see you there!

This Thursday, October 10th, 2013 from 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM at Columbia University’s Institute for Research on Women, Gender and Sexuality, Professor Mark Anthony Neal will be speaking for IRWAG’s Queer Futures series on his book Looking for Leroy: Illegible Black Masculinities

Looking for Leroy is an analysis of the complex ways in which black masculinity has been read and misread through contemporary American popular culture. Neal argues that black men and boys are bound, in profound ways, to and by their legibility. The most “legible” black male bodies are often rendered as criminal, bodies in need of policing and containment. Ironically, Neal argues, this sort of legibility brings welcome relief to white America, providing easily identifiable images of black men in an era defined by shifts in racial, sexual, and gendered identities.

Mark Anthony Neal is Professor of Black Popular Culture in the Department of African and African-American Studies at Duke University, where he won the 2010 Robert B. Cox Award for Teaching. He is the author of What the Music Said: Black Popular Music and Black Public CultureSoul Babies: Black Popular Culture and the Post-Soul AestheticSongs in the Keys of Black Life: A Rhythm and Blues Nation, and New Black Man: Rethinking Black Masculinity

Reception to follow. Copies of Looking for Leroy will be available for purchase. We hope to see you there!

NYU Press author Robin Bernstein wins IRSCL award

One of our authors, Robin Bernstein, recently won the Award from the International Research Society for Children’s Literature for her book, Racial Innocence: Performing American Childhood from Slavery to Civil Rights. Congratulations!

For many, the Superbowl is a time of admirable athleticism, commercials rivaling cinema megaproductions, and elaborate snack food arrangements. In some special cases, it’s even a time of adorable puppies. Just look at those mugs!

But the Superbowl is also an opportunity to recognize the NFL’s important contributions to the civil rights movement, as the integration of African American players into the League only cemented the foundation for the widespread social change that was to follow. Charles K. Ross explores these developments and the histories of the NFL’s early African American players in Outside the Lines, published by (yours truly!) NYU Press. With both the Superbowl and Black History Month on the horizon, there couldn’t be a better time to check out this fascinating book!

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(Now, if you’ll excuse me, I think I’m going to curl up in an armchair, turn on the Puppy Bowl, and do some reading.)