Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 through October 15) by checking out events at your local library, or browsing through one of these classic Latino/a Studies books!

Clockwise from top left: The Latino/a Condition: A Critical Reader, Second Edition; Beyond El Barrio: Everyday Life in Latina/o AmericaLatino Spin: Public Image and the Whitewashing of RaceLatino/a Popular CultureLoca Motion: The Travels of Chicana and Latina Popular Culture.

Happy Banned Books Week!
Two of our very own books—Critical Race Theory and The Latino Condition—were banned in Arizona last year following the Tucson Unified School District’s decision to dissolve its Mexican American Studies program. 
This week, we’re celebrating the freedom to read by offering 25% off these “forbidden” books on our website. To save, simply enter promo code BANBK at check out. Happy reading!

Happy Banned Books Week!

Two of our very own books—Critical Race Theory and The Latino Conditionwere banned in Arizona last year following the Tucson Unified School District’s decision to dissolve its Mexican American Studies program.

This week, we’re celebrating the freedom to read by offering 25% off these “forbidden” books on our website. To save, simply enter promo code BANBK at check out. Happy reading!

Meanwhile, for 40 years gay activism has taken shape amid a period of wealth inequity that would make 19th century robber barons blush. The upshot? Queers are at an economic disadvantage, with little economic voice among power brokers.
Lisa Henderson, author of Love and Money: Queers, Class, and Cultural Production, on queer class solidarity. Her article gives us another perspective on Pride, and a fresh imagining of queer politics. Check it out!
So I wait for the Supreme Court decisions, and wonder how the outcome will shape the landscape of gay rights. Will we become even more fixedly two Americas for gay people: one that supports its gay residents, and one that continues to push gay people into the toxic closet? If so, have I chosen the wrong America?
Contemporary LGBT culture may seem centered in urban areas, but Bernadette Barton, author of Pray the Gay Away: The Extraordinary Lives of Bible Belt Gays, moves away from the metronormative lens to highlight the challenges of queers living in the rural South. Check out her new article on the upcoming Supreme Court rulings and the uneasiness of queers living in the Bible Belt.

NYU Press author Robin Bernstein wins IRSCL award

One of our authors, Robin Bernstein, recently won the Award from the International Research Society for Children’s Literature for her book, Racial Innocence: Performing American Childhood from Slavery to Civil Rights. Congratulations!

Throwback Thursday: Pride Edition

Here at NYU Press, we occasionally rediscover books from our past that shock or surprise us. Rather than being a source of concern for our mothers and various religious leaders, we’d like to think that the titillating content of our collection is what makes us unique… right?

Throughout LGBTQ Pride Month, we will be highlighting past queeriosities from our catalogue as part of our Throwback Thursday series. Up first is Martin P. Levine’s Gay Macho (1998), which is serving up some Marlboro pack realness—not to mention a hunky leatherman. Check it out!

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Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to go pick apples with my beard-y future husband.
We interviewed the newest member of the NYU Press team, Tom Sullivan, and talked about food, radical queerness, and tips for surviving New York City. Whether you’re seeking a glimpse into our bizarre little world or simply a list of neighborhoods with some outrageously good food, this interview is sure to please! 
Known for her legal thrillers, University of Colorado law professor Wesson (Chilling Effect) employs her expertise to great effect in this exhaustive study of a famous crime that left its mark on the American legal system…Wesson’s efforts result in a true crime drama that’s well researched, easy to read, and oddly compelling.
Publishers Weekly has posted a review of one our books, A Death at Crooked Creek, by author Marianne Wesson. Give it a look!
…the familiar understanding of the Civil Rights movement is that Martin Luther King, Jr., was the person who initiated it—but in fact, ass-kicking investigator and activist Rosa Parks was initiating resistance while King was still in high school. She wasn’t an elderly woman who happened to sit on the bus: she was a radical activist who saw what needed to be done, and then kept her mouth shut so that she could become a strategic symbol.
Alison Piepmeier (author of Girl Zines) gives us her take on Women’s History Month and the histories it omits. Check it out!